Fall is finally here. After the long summer months of heat, the air starts to cool down, Madrilenians go back to their routines, the leaves fall, and the theatre season brings exciting new shows to the stages of the capital. Here are our recommendations for this fall 2016.

  1. El lugar sin límites. Poster. Courtesy of Pradillo/CDN.

    El lugar sin límites. Poster. Courtesy of Pradillo/CDN.

    El lugar sin límites (The place without limits). The cycle organised by Pradillo in collaboration with the National Dramatic Center (Centro Dramático Nacional) comes back after a wonderful first edition last year, which offered the work of some of the most exciting new dramaturgies in Spanish. This new edition invites bold creators to reflect on the concepts of home and storytelling. Ivo Dimchev opened El lugar sin límites last week, and artists such as Aitana Cordero, Luisa Pardo, Oscar Gómez Mata or Edurne Rubio will follow in the upcoming weeks. El lugar sin límites takes place in the Pradillo theatre, the CDN and the Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo until October 16. Find more information and buy tickets here.

  1. Abadía Theatre. Incendios. Abadía theatre just premiered Wajdi Mouawad’s powerful text Incendies (Fires), a modern classical tragedy, in collaboration with Ysarca and Teatro del Invernadero, directed by Mario Gas and with abrilliant cast lead by one of Spain’s most admired actresses, Nuria Espert. From September 14th to October 30th at Abadía Theatre.
  1. Laia Marull and Nuria Espert in Incendios. Photo: Ros Ribas. Courtesy of Teatro Abadía.

    Laia Marull and Nuria Espert in Incendios. Photo: Ros Ribas. Courtesy of Teatro Abadía.

    El año del Pensamiento Mágico (The Year of Magical Thinking). Although Guindalera sadly closed its doors in June, it remains open as a center of creation and rehearsal, and their work will be seen in other theaters around the country. Juan Pastor’s version of Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking with Jeannine Mestre will be in Abadía Theatre from November 16th to 27th. More here.

  1. Pavón Kamikaze Theatre. El plan. The Pavón Theatre reopened its doors on September 8th under the direction of Kamikaze Teatro. For their first season, the company is restaging some of their best shows in their new home, and they are aiming to give visibility to the city’s alternative or “Off” theatre. El plan, an Uroboro Producción show written and directed by Ignasi Vidal, won the Godoff Prize for Best Play in 2015. You can see it from October 6th to 23rd at Pavón Kamikaze Theatre.
  1. Valle Inclán Theatre (CDN). La Cocina (The Kitchen). Twenty-six actors are cast in this Arnold Wesker’s play directed by Sergio Peris-Mencheta. From November 18th to December 30th. And last year’s show Reikiavik, written and directed by Juan Mayorga, returns to the Valle Inclán from September 28 to October 30. With actors Daniel Albadalejo, Elena Rayos and César Sarachu.
  1. Daniel Grao and Nacho Sánchez in La piedra oscura. Photo: Marcos G Punto. Courtesy of Teatro Galileo.

    Daniel Grao and Nacho Sánchez in La piedra oscura. Photo: Marcos G Punto. Courtesy of Teatro Galileo.

    Galileo Theatre. La piedra oscura (The Dark Stone). Alberto Conejero’s play received 5 Max awards last year, and is back at the Galileo Theatre until November 6th. Directed by Pablo Messiez, with actors Daniel Grao and Nacho Sánchez, La piedra oscura explores Spanish historical memory through the life of Rafael Rodríguez Rapún, Lorca’s last lover. Tickets and information.

  1. International stars visit Spain. Slava Polunin’s famous Slava’s Snowshow is in Madrid until October 9th, at the Canal Theatres. Wajdi Mouawad will bring Des mourants: Inflamation du verbe vivre / Les larmes D’dipe to the Valle Inclán theatre on October 28th-30th. The rest of the CDN’s Una Mirada al mundo cycle is very worth watching too. Romeo Castellucci will inaugurate the Festival de otoño a primavera with Go Down, Moses on October 13 to 15, at the Canal theaters.

This post was written by the author in their personal capacity.The opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not reflect the view of The Theatre Times, their staff or collaborators.