Al-Azraki

Al-Azraki
regional managing editor - Iraq

Al-Azraki is an Assistant Professor of Arabic language, drama and diasporic literature at Renison University College, University of Waterloo. He received his PhD in Theatre Studies from York University in Toronto, Canada. Al-Azraki is also a playwright and the co-editor and co-translator of Contemporary Plays from Iraq.

The Representation of Political Violence in the Plays about Iraq (2003-2011)

Introduction [1] Political violence (resistance violence, revolutionary violence, state violence, wars and terrorism) has been a compelling topic for many playwrights and researchers. As far back as the classical drama of ancient Athens, plays like Prometheus Bound, Oedipus Rex, Antigone, and the Bacchae have depicted violence that could be, in a sense, regarded as ‘political.’ During the Renaissance, terror was used as a “weapon of state power”, and this is reflected in some of the Elizabethan dramas where “Renaissance tragedy has its origins in Tudor terror and in the embryonic British state as much as in the Italian city-state of...

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Theatre of the Oppressed in Iraq

Theatre of the Oppressed was originated in the 1970s by a Brazilian theatre practitioner and activist, Augusto Boal (1931-2009). Influenced by Marxism, and by Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Boal created a theatrical practice where the audience members cease to be passive receivers of performance and become active participants in it. This makes them what Boal calls “spect-actors,” engaging in “rehearsals of change.” One of the forms of the Theatre of the Oppressed he called “Forum Theatre.” The core concept of this form is that the “spect-actors” (participatory audience members) initially see a short performance, which dramatizes an issue...

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